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Welcome New Members & Sponsors!


The Woodwork Career Alliance of North America is pleased to welcome 16 new EDUcation™ member schools, one new MANufacturing™ member, and three new INDustry™ Sponsors. We also welcome back nine sponsors for another year.

Thank you for your membership and support!

New EDUcation™ Members

Burns High School, Lawndale, NC
Crest High School, Shelby, NC
Greenville High School, Greenwood, WI
Hendersonville High School, Hendersonville, NC
Hocking College, Nelsonville, OH
Lancaster High School, Lancaster, WI
Merrill High School, Merrill, WI
North Henderson High School, Hendersonville, NC
Platteville High School, Platteville, WI
Sevastopol High School, Sturgeon Bay, WI
Seymour High School, Seymour, WI
Sheboygan Central High School, Sheboygan, WI
Shoshoni High School, Shoshoni WY
Webster High School, Webster, WI
West Essex High School, North Caldwell, NH
West Henderson High School, Hendersonville, NC

Find WCA EDUcation™ woodworking programs in your area.


New MANufacturing™ Member
Hunter Trim & Cabinets, Fort Worth, TX

New INDustry™ Gold Sponsor
Festool, Lebanon, IN
Kreg Tool, Huxley, IA

INDustry™ Gold Sponsor Renewal
Friulmac,
Hickory, NC
Shopbot Tools,
Durham, NC
Wood-Ed Table by Mimbus, Chicago, IL

New INDustry™ Silver Sponsors
Bessey Tools, Cambridge, ON

GDP Guhdo,
Marietta, GA

View all WCA INDustry™ Sponsors & Supporters.

Learn more about the benefits of sponsoring the WCA.

The Trials and Tribulations of Teaching Woodworking Online

Doug Rappe of the Greater West Town Community Development Project used this setup for teaching a Google Classroom remote wood identification class.

The novel coronavirus pandemic has left an indelible mark on education institutions across North America by forcing the vast majority of schools to close for the remainder of the academic year.

The transition from teaching students in the classroom to online has most especially been fraught with challenges for woodworking instructors belonging to the Woodwork Career Alliance of North America. As if having to dispense with woodshop activities wasn’t hard enough, most teachers were given only a few days of notice that their school was being shut.

With so little warning, they scrambled to develop new lesson plans for online instruction on the fly.

Don Stoneburner, a student at Boyceville High School, proudly displays the WCA Sawblade certificate he earned after successfully completing the online test.

While online learning cannot make up for the hands-on experience of using equipment and tools to create wood projects, woodworking instructors participating in a survey of the Woodwork Career Alliance of North America explained how they revamped their curricula to incorporate a variety of alternative coursework and online resources. This includes taking advantage of videos, woodworking articles, past SkillsUSA project plans and other materials available online to WCA EDUcation members.

In spite of the disruptions created by COVID-19, several of the high school instructors said they already had or were in the process or preparing students to take the online test to earn their WCA Sawblade Certificate. Fortunately these students had already been evaluated on machine setup and operation on jointers, table saws and other basic woodworking equipment before their schools closed.

Some of the key questioned posed in the WCA COVID-19 survey included:

  • How have their programs been impacted by the coronavirus outbreak?
    What types of information are they teaching online?
  • How many educators are accessing the WCA’s resource library and what materials are they using?
  • What tools would they like to see added to the resource library?
  • Would they be willing to “donate” resources they have developed for their program to the WCA’s tool box for use by their peers?

Survey Highlights
Twenty-eight woodworking educators responded to the survey, including 26 high school teachers, one college instructor and one community training program instructor.

Seventy-nine percent of the respondents said their schools were shuttered due to state stay-at-home orders and were teaching classes online. Fourteen percent said their schools were closed and they were not teaching online.

Hurley High School students apply a finish to their woodshop project.

Forty-six percent said they were utilizing WCA online training resources, with several others indicating they planned to take a closer look at the videos and written materials available.

The bulk of the survey was composed of open-ended questions. Most of the teachers participating in the survey gave permission for information from their responses to be directly attributed to them In most cases they were sent questions to clarify or embellish some of their responses.

What follows are encapsulated summaries of how some of the woodworking instructors who took part in the survey have dealt with the shift to teaching classes online.

Frank Fetzer, woodworking, engineering and math teacher, Boyceville High School, Boyceville, WI
Fetzer said he featured measurement demonstrations and tests, YouTube woodworking videos and online discussions have been featured in online classes. In addition, he said he gave students “home maintenance assignments.” “These are not necessarily woodworking, but does give them something hands-on to do at home.” He also had students read/watch Fine Woodworking articles/videos with assigned write ups. Finally, he’s working on helping eligible students pass the WCA Sawblade test. Read expanded commentary.

Mickey Turner, woodworking 1, 2, 3 at John Holmes High School, Edenton, NC
“This whole thing has been hard for me to process,” Turner said. “I am a first-year teacher still learning the process and now this. Especially considering that I just got to the apply power tools agenda. There is no app for woodworking.” In the absence of being able to provide hands-on woodworking instruction for his students, Turner said, “I’ve been giving them bell ringers like school.net test questions, portable and stationary power tool safety procedures and quiz booklets. I have added some short instructional videos on portable power tools and some YouTube videos.”

Students work in tandem in Ashville High School’s woodworking shop.

Scott Bruening, tech education teacher, Kettle Moraine High School, Wales, WI
“I’m just finding it really difficult not being able to do anything hands-on at this point,” Bruening said. “I’m just trying to get more resources online for students to access. I’ve been using the older version of the textbook. We’ve focused on techniques and types of joinery in a visual manner, plus vocabulary, key terms and general knowledge items.” Read expanded commentary.

Marc Fry, woods manufacturing instructor, Green Bay East High School, Green Bay, WI
“I am struggling to find any visual examples, formats or layout of any woods instructor online,” Fry said. “Is there a way someone could provide Google classroom-ready slides and worksheets that are easily downloadable along with some kind of answer sheet and key?” Fry added that he taught four sections of Woods 1 and Advanced Woods 2. One online resource Fry mentioned using by name is edpuzzle.com.

Tom Hillstead, cabinetmaking instructor, Saint Paul College, Saint Paul, MN
Hillstead is the only college-level woodworking instructor to participate in the survey. He said he focused on teaching CAD/CNC software; laminates and surfaces; hardware used in casework and estimating. “I have 15 students this semester and they have adapted very well to our adjusted learning environment,” Hillstead said. “It’s not their first choice but… We have five courses this semester, three of which we were able to move online. One course, which was to run the last 8 weeks, will require “gap” instruction once we are able to return to the shop later this summer. It’s been an adjustment for everyone, but overall, it’s been positive. Even though the hands-on experience can never be replaced, my students and I have all learned a lot about the available technology, and I’m looking forward to incorporating where I can into future courses. Lots of videotaped demos!”

John Stearns, instructor, The MiLL and Peyton High School, Colorado Springs and Peyton, CO
In transitioning to online teaching, Stearns said he placed greater emphasis on reading and creating drawings, soft skills like leadership and personal growth, the business of woodworking and cabinet identification. He added that he has used old SkillsUSA project drawings in the WCA’s online resource for students to practice creating a bill of materials.

Roger Peterson, woods instructor, Hurley School, Hurley, WI
“I’m just trying to keep the kids engaged and understand how to do some things online,” Peterson said. “We are project planning for next year, revisiting some WCA Sawblade credentialing material (including measurement) and seeing how we can apply what we learned through the year to work on ‘around the house’ projects. This is a challenging time and when students see everyone working together to get through this … THAT is what they are truly learning!”

Tom Witt, woods manufacturing instructor, Monroe High School, Monroe, WI
“I am a dual credit teacher instructing 47 students online and have access to Patrick Molzahn’s information and videos on the WCA website,” Witt said. “We have focused on technical information and machine safety utilizing text and video demonstrations.” For his beginning level Woods Manufacturing 1 class, Witt said, “I am going through all the machines in the order that we use them to ‘square’ a single piece of stock including radial arm saws, jointers, planers and table saws.”

Doug Rappe, program coordinator, Greater West Town Training Partnership, Chicago, IL
“We are teaching the classroom portion of the curriculum remotely including math, reading, print reading and job readiness,” said Rappe, whose program trains economically disadvantaged adults for woodworking careers. Rappe said he has used some of the WCA videos produced by Patrick Molzahn, director of the cabinetmaking and millwork program at Madison College. Read expanded commentary.

Molly Turner, wood manufacturing instructor, Ignacio High School and Middle School, Ignacia, CO
“I’ve used Fine Woodworking/Fine Homebuilding online access to have students do research and read articles,” Turner said. “We are also getting ready to test students for their Sawblade certificates in my upper level classes. These students have reviewed machine set-up and operation standards. I’m also going to use the Sawblade certificate quiz as part of their final exam.”

Turner said she has utilized a Career Exploration packet that features “two career profiles including salaries, pros and cons, SkillsUSA framework and a resume,” plus UGears model kits with a project log and a product review at the end. “I’m brainstorming on project learning options that can be done at home with no tools, maybe pre-fabricated kits similar to UGears laser-cut models or paper automata karakuri projects,” she added. Read expanded commentary.

Christopher Randall, Asheville High School, Asheville, NC
“My candidates all did the Sawblade certificate performance widget right before we were all sent home,” Randall said. “I digitally reviewed so that they could take their online Sawblade tests. I’ve also used the free Fine Woodworking archives link on the WCA’s website.” Randall added, “Since turnout is low and I am at home practicing social distance and home schooling my own children, I am simply filming videos and sharing building projects with my students. They are sharing back with me what they can build at home.” Read expanded commentary.

Steve Swanson, Wauwatosa West High School, Wauwatosa, WI
“We are designing a kitchen using ADA standards and some household measurements,” Swanson said, adding that he utilized some of the measurement materials available in the WCA’s online resources.

Learn more about WCA EDUcation membership and benefits.

A student at Ignacio School operates a Kreg router back in the pre-COVID-19 pandemic days.

29 High Schools Join Woodwork Career Alliance

Students of Hononegah High School pose with their fall semester woodworking projects.

Nellysford, VA – The Woodwork Career Alliance of North America welcomes 29 high school woodworking programs as EDUcation™ members for the 2019-20 academic year.

The 29 new EDU members include 13 schools in Wisconsin, four each in North Carolina and Illinois, and two in California. The other six schools are located in Minnesota, Nevada, Ohio, Utah, Washington and Alberta, Canada.

With the newly added schools, WCA EDU membership now totals more than 130 in the U.S. and Canada. In addition to high school woodshops, EDU membership includes college woodworking programs and other career technical education institutions.

EDU member programs are licensed to use the WCA Woodworking Skill Standards and Passport credentialing program recognized throughout North America. Other EDU member benefits include access to training materials and videos, plus free and exclusive discounts for woodshop necessities through the WCA Essentials Benefit Package.

Chadrick Parrott, who has been teaching woodworking classes for 12 years, including the last seven at Indian Valley High School of Gnadenhutten, OH, said he chose to join the WCA “to formalize my curriculum to align with current industry standards. I hope to improve our curriculum and develop relationships with other teachers and industry professionals.”

Jason Glodowski, who instructs about 50 students each year at Hononegeh High School in Rockton, IL, said, “I decided to join the WCA because of the national certification that students can obtain as well as the standardized nationally recognized assessments in the program. I’m hoping my local business partners recognize and value my certified students in the hiring process. And I’m also hoping that it brings more local and state recognition to my program, in regards to level of quality and what is to be expected of my students.” Glodowski noted that Hononegeh High School plans to add a second level cabinetry class.

“We’re pleased to welcome these new EDU members to the WCA,” said Scott Nelson, WCA president. “These schools are demonstrating their commitment to making sure their woodworking programs are in line with industry’s needs for candidates who have been trained to safely operate equipment and have demonstrated the aptitude to continue growing their woodworking skills.”

The full list of new WCA EDU member high schools includes:

Arroyo High School, El Monte, CA
Bartlett Yancey High School, Yanceyville, NC
Battle Ground High School, Brush Prairie, WA
Beloit Memorial High School, Beloit, WI
Bertie High School, Windsor, NC
Crosby-Ironton High School, Crosby, MN
D.C. Everest High School, Schofield, WI
Dakota High School, Dakota, IL
F. J. Turner High School, Beloit, WI
Fennimore High School, Fennimore, WI
Franklin High School, Franklin, WI
Hillcrest High School, Midvale, UT
Hononegah Community School, Rockton, IL
Indian Valley High School, Gnadenhutten, OH
Jefferson High School, Jefferson, WI
Johns A. Holmes High School, Edenton, NC
Kettle Moraine High School, Wales, WI
Lord Beaverbrook High School, Calgary, AB
Louisburg High School, Franklinton, NC
Mukwonago High School, Mukwonago, WI
Oregon High School, Oregon, WI
Palmyra-Eagle High School, Palmyra, WI
Pecatonica High School, Pecatonica, IL
Ridgewood High School, Norridge, IL
San Marcos High School, Santa Barbara, CA
South Milwaukee High School, South Milwaukee, WI
Spring Creek High School, Spring Creek, NV
Stoughton High School, Stoughton, WI
West High School, Wauwatosa, WI

About the Woodwork Career Alliance
The Woodwork Career Alliance of North America was founded in 2007 as a 501(c)(3) non-profit corporation and is governed by a volunteer board of directors. The WCA’s mission is to develop and administer a unified set of Skill Standards for the wood products industry. Since 2011, WCA has developed observable and measurable performance standards and assessments for more than 300 woodworking machine operations. In addition, WCA has issued more than 2,500 credentials, a portable, personal permanent record documenting each holder’s record of woodworking skill achievements. More than 130 high schools and post-secondary schools throughout North America are WCA EDUcation™ members and a growing number of woodworking companies have joined the WCA as MANufacturing™ members. To learn more about the WCA and how to get involved with its programs, including sponsorship opportunities, visit WoodworkCareer.org.

Welcome New Members & Renewing Sponsors!

The Woodwork Career Alliance of North America is pleased to welcome 20 new EDUcation™ member schools, two new MANufacturing™ members, three new INDustry™ Sponsors. We also welcome back four sponsors for a second year.

Thank you for your membership and support!

EDUcation™ Members
Bartlett Yancey High School, Yanceyville, NC
Battle Ground High School, Brush Prairie, WA
Bertie High School, Windsor, NC
D.C. Everest High School, Schofield, WI
F. J. Turner High School, Beloit, WI Wauwatosa
Fennimore High School, Fennimore, WI
Franklin High School, Franklin, WI
Hononegah Community School, Rockton, IL
Indian Valley High School, Gnadenhutten, OH
Jefferson High School, Jefferson, WI
Johns A. Holmes High School, Edenton, NC
Lord Beaverbrook High School, Calgary, AB
Louisburg High School, Franklinton, NC
Mukwonago High School, Mukwonago, WI
Oregon High School, Oregon, WI
Oxnard High School, Oxnard, CA
Palmyra-Eagle High School, Palmyra, WI
Pecatonica High School, Pecatonica, IL
South Milwaukee High School, South Milwaukee, WI
Spring Creek High School, Spring Creek, NV
West High School, Wauwatosa, WI

Find a WCA EDUcation™ woodworking program in your area.

MANufacturing™ Members
Anton Cabinetry, Pentago, TX
VSI Custom Cabinets Inc., Lynwood, CA

New INDustry™ Gold Sponsors
Architectural Woodwork Institute Quality Certification Program,
Potomoc Falls, VA
Blum Inc., Stanley, NC

New INDustry™ Silver Sponsor
Williams & Hussey, Amherst, NH

INDustry™ Gold Sponsor Renewal
Roseburg Forest Products, Springfield, OR

INDustry™ Silver Sponsor Renewals
Eagle Mouldings. Minneapolis, MN
IMA-Schelling, Morrisville, NC
Kerfkore, Brunswick, GA

View all WCA INDustry™ Sponsors & Supporters

President’s Message: WCA EDUcation Membership Is Growing

WCA is ending the annual renewal process for all EDUcation members and I am happy to report that the renews are coming in at a very good rate. In addition, we have added 21 schools as EDUcation members,  plus two new woodworking companies to the ranks of our growing MANufacturing membership.

See the full list of all our newest members and sponsors.

WCA is also growing its roster of Accredited Skill Evaluators. We will be adding 20 new ASE teachers during training sessions at Montgomery County High School in Mt. Gilead, NC, on Oct. 24 and at Madison College in Madison, WI, on Oct. 25. These ASE instructors will be able to start evaluating students in their woodworking programs to earn WCA tool points toward earning their Sawblade Certificate.

What makes both ASE training sessions particularly timely is that we have articles related to the woodworking programs at Montgomery High School and Madison College in this edition of Pathways. I encourage all woodworking instructors to check out the article about the North Carolina Summer Career and Technical Education Conference. Dan Kern, WCA chief evaluator of North Carolina and an instructor at Montgomery High School, coordinated the woodworking workshops during the CTE conference.

The news item related to Madison College concerns Ethan Harrison who represented the U.S. in the WorldSkills woodworking competition in Kazan, Russia. Ethan honed his skills with instruction and encouragement from Jeff Molazhn, instructor at Madison College, who also happens to be an ASE.

Finally, I’d like to offer my personal congratulations to Richard Memory, apprentice woodworker at Jefferson Millwork & Design, for being the first professional to earn his WCA red credential. Jefferson Millwork has demonstrated its leadership as a WCA MANufacturing member by intertwining the WCA skill standards, credentialing program and financial incentives to reward employees like Richard who advance through the company’s training program. Bravo!

Scott Nelson
President
Woodwork Career Alliance of North America
snelsonwca@gmail.com

 

 

 

Welcome New Members & Renewing Sponsors!

The Woodwork Career Alliance of North America is pleased to welcome five new EDUcation™ member schools, four new MANufacturing™ members, one new Association Partner  and four new INDustry™ Sponsors. We also welcome back one sponsor for a second year.

Thank you for your membership and support!

EDUcation™ Members
Arroyo High School, El Monte, CA
Dakota High School, Dakota, IL
Ridgewood High School, Norridge, IL
San Marcos High School, Santa Barbara, CA
Stoughton High School, Stoughton, WI

Find a WCA EDUcation™ woodworking program in your area.

MANufacturing™ Members
Gaston & Wyatt, Charlottesville, NC
Gillpatrick Woodworks, Overland Park, KS
Mission Bell Manufacturing, Morgan Hill, CA
Rowland Woodworking, High Point, NC

New Association Partner
Kitchen Cabinet Manufacturers Association

New INDustry™ Gold Sponsors
James L. Taylor Manufacturing
, Poughkeepsie, NY
Rowland Woodworking, High Point, NC
Safety Speed Manufacturing, Ham Lake, MN
Woodworking Network/FDMC, Cedar Rapids, IA

INDustry™ Gold Sponsor Renewals
Friulmac USA, Hickory, NC

View all WCA INDustry™ Sponsors & Supporters

Welcome New Members & Renewing Sponsors

The Woodwork Career Alliance of North America is pleased to welcome four new EDUcation™ member schools, one new MANufacturing™ members  and five new INDustry™ Sponsors. We also welcome back two sponsors for a second year.

Thank you for your membership and support!

EDUcation™ Members
Beloit Memorial High School, Beloit, WI
Crosby-Ironton High School, Crosby, MN
Hillcrest High School, Midvale, UT
Kettle Moraine High School, Wales, WI

Find a WCA EDUcation™ woodworking program in your area.

MANufacturing™ Members
Advanced Fixtures Inc., Farmersville, TX

New INDustry™ Gold Sponsors
Lutz Woodworks,
Wylie, TX
Hafele America, Archdale, NC
Newman Machine,
Browns Summit, NC
SawStop,
Tualatin, OR
ShopBot Tools,
Durham, NC

INDustry™ Gold Sponsor Renewals
WoodEd Table by Mimbus, Chicago, IL 

INDustry™ Silver Sponsor Renewals
Aiken Controls,
Lenoir, NC

View all WCA INDustry™ Sponsors & Supporters

Welcome New Members & Renewed Sponsors!

The Woodwork Career Alliance of North America is pleased to welcome 17 new EDUcation™ member schools, three new MANufacturing members  and five INDustry™ Sponsors. We also welcome back a baker’s dozen sponsors for a second year.

Thank you for your membership and support!

EDUcation™ Members

Arrowhead High School, Hartland, WI
Belleville High School, Belleville, WI
Bradford High School, Kenosha, WI
Des Moines East High School, Des Moines, IA
Franklin High School, Portland, OR
Havelock High School, New Bern, NC
Indian Trail High School, Kenosha, WI
Jacksboro ISD, Jacksboro, TX
New Bern High School, New Bern, NC
Pisgah High School, Waynesville, NC
Pueblo County High School, Pueblo, CO
Redmond High School, Redmond, OR
Reynolds High School, Troutdale, OR
Smoky Mountain High School, Sylva, NC
Tremper High School, Kenosha, WI
Wolfe County High School, Campton, KY
Yukon Education, Whitehorse, Yukon Territory

Find a WCA EDUcation™ woodworking program in your area.

MANufacturing™ Members
California Designers Choice Custom Cabinetry, Camarillo, CA
Danlee Wood Products – Forreston, IL
Multi-Housing Depot – Burlington, NJ

New INDustry™ Gold Sponsors
Gemini Coatings
, Reno, OK
Pro-Ply Custom Plywood, Brampton, ON
SCM Group USA
, Duluth, GA
Stiles Machinery, Grand Rapids, MI

New INDustry™ Silver Sponsors
Sorrelli Woodwork Consultants,
Brooklyn, NY
Weima North America, Fort Mill, SC

INDustry™ Gold Sponsor Renewals
Atlantic Plywood, Woburn, MA
Columbia Forest Products, Greensboro, NC
Daniels-Olsen, A Metro Hardwoods Company, Sioux Falls, SD
Intermountain Wood Products, Salt Lake City, UT
M.L. Campbell, Ft. Erie, ON
Milesi Wood Coatings, Charlotte, NC
North American Building Material Distribution Association (NBMDA), Chicago, IL
OHARCO, Lincoln, NE
Rev-A-Shelf, Louisville, KY
Web Don, Charlotte, NC
Wurth Group North America, Ramsey, NJ

INDustry™ Silver Sponsor Renewals
Brookhuis,
Suwanee, GA
Lutz Woodworks, Wylie, TX

View all WCA INDustry™ Sponsors & Supporters

WCA EDUcation Donations: Worth the Price of Subscription

Free and highly-discounted products more than cover the annual fee for high school and postsecondary woodshops to belong to the Woodwork Career Alliance.


Nellysford, VA –
There are many good reasons for high school and postsecondary woodworking programs to become EDUcation™ members of the Woodwork Career Alliance of North America.

Most importantly, being affiliated with the WCA’s industry-recognized credentialing program adds credibility to the school’s woodshop curriculum as aspiring to professional standards. In addition, instructors gain access to a treasure trove of training tools including the WCA Woodworking Skill Standards, how-to videos, past SkillsUSA project plans and other online resources. EDU-member instructors also can apply for financial support and scholarships to benefit their students and personal development.

In case those benefits are not compelling enough to justify the modest annual $250 investment for WCA EDUcation membership, then consider the value of the WCA Essentials™ Benefits Package. It more than outweighs the cost to join.

“The Essentials Benefits Package offers useful resources for any woodworking program,” said Patrick Molzahn, treasurer of the WCA and director of the cabinetmaking and millwork program at Madison Area Technical College of Madison, WI. “From consumables such as screws, glue, and veneer, to access to exclusive online information from Taunton Press and training from Stiles Machinery, the package easily offers more value than the cost of the annual membership.”

Tom Hillstead and Mark Smith are just two instructors of WCA EDUcation schools who appreciate receiving the free and discounted products to benefit their programs.

“Being on a tight budget, every little bit helps,” said Hillstead, cabinetmaking instructor at St. Paul College of St. Paul, MN. “We always receive products that we can use in our shop. The donation packages are a great benefit to our program and more than worth the annual WCA membership cost.”

“The support our program receives from industry suppliers through the WCA has been invaluable,” said Smith, industrial technology teacher at Reed-Cutler High School of Braidwood, IL. “We put to use everything that is supplied to enhance the curriculum we are delivering. Though the Reed-Custer school district has been very supportive, my program always needs items that are beyond what the budget can support. The support my program has received over the years from industry has made all the difference.”

The Essentials Benefit Package being offered to WCA EDUcation members for the 2018-19 school year includes:

WCA Gold Sponsor Bessey Tools North America of Cambridge, ON – 40% discount on all clamps and other products;

CabWriter of Easthampton, MA – 40% discount on CabWriter Cabinet Design Software;

Franklin International of Columbus, OH – two gallons of Titebond wood glue;

Quickscrews of Livermore, CA – $50 credit toward the purchase of wood screws and fasteners;

Rockler Woodworking & Hardware of Medina, MN – assorted Rockler products;

Stiles University of Grand Rapids, MI – one tuition-free registration annually to WCA EDUcation member instructors;

Taunton Press of Newtown, CT – complimentary digital memberships to FineHomebuilding.com  and FineWoodworking.com; and

Veneer Technologies of Newport, NC – 150 square feet of decorative hardwood veneer.

To learn more about becoming a WCA EDUcation member visit woodworkcareer.org.

For more information about becoming a WCA Essentials Benefit Package donor, contact Scott Nelson, WCA president, at 402-610-6043 or snelsonwca@gmail.com.

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About the Woodwork Career Alliance
The Woodwork Career Alliance of North America was founded in 2007 as a 501(c)(3) non-profit corporation and is governed by a volunteer board of directors. The WCA’s mission is to develop and administer a unified set of Skill Standards for the wood products industry. Since 2011, WCA has developed observable and measurable performance standards and assessments for more than 240 woodworking machine operations. In addition, WCA has issued over 1,800 credentials, a portable, personal permanent record documenting each holder’s record of woodworking skill achievements. More than 100 high schools and post-secondary schools throughout North America are WCA EDUcation™ members. To learn more about the WCA and how to get involved with its programs, including sponsorship opportunities, visit WoodworkCareer.org.