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President’s Message – Virtual Reality Demos, Silent Auction, WCA 4.0, ASE Training on WCA’s Busy AWFS Fair Agenda

This edition of Pathways is laden with news and features previewing the Woodwork Career Alliance of North America’s plans for the 2019 AWFS Fair taking place next week at the Las Vegas Convention Center. 

For starters, we still have a limited number of slots open for our WCA Accredited Skill Evaluator (ACE) Trainings at the show. The three-hour trainings will take place at our Booth #10268 during the following dates and times:

Wednesday, July 17
9:00 a.m. – 12:00 p.m.
1:00 p.m. – 4:00 p.m.

Thursday, July 18
9:00 a.m. – 12:00 p.m.
1:00 p.m. – 4:00 p.m.

Friday, July 19
9:00 a.m. – 12:00 p.m.
1:00 p.m. – 4:00 p.m.

Saturday, July 20
9:00 a.m. – 12:00 p.m.

You may register by contacting me at snelsonwca@gmail.com. WCA and AWFS are partnering to offer a SHOW SPECIAL PRICE of $150 per evaluator, which is a savings of $100. Remember this also includes a one-year subscription to WCA for your school or company.

WCA is also involved with three free workshops during the show. Patrick Molzahn, director of Cabinetmaking at Madison College and author of Modern Cabinetmaking, will present: “WCA – What’s in It for Me?” 1:30pm-3:00pm Wednesday, July 17 and “Finding, Training & Retaining Workers,” 11:30am–1:00pm Thursday, July 18. Patrick and I will co-present “Building a Training Program for Your Workers,” 3:30pm-5:00pm Friday, July 19. Check out the conference schedule on awfsfair.org to learn more details and to register.

Please stop by our booth and try your hand at the Mimbus virtual reality simulators. The Wood-Ed Table is a four-in-one system that can be used to teach students and novices how to operate basic woodworking machinery in a safe, dust-free environment. Visitors to WCA’s booth will have an opportunity to don a VR headset and try out one of the Wood-Ed Table’s four woodworking machinery simulation modules: bandsaw, ripsaw, jointer or shaper. 

Simspray is a virtual reality apparatus that replicates a spray booth allowing trainees to learn the fundamentals of applying a wood coating using a hand-held spray gun. Simspray not only eliminates the cost of finishing materials, it removes VOC emissions from spray operator training programs. Attendees will be able to test their spray skills virtually finishing wood parts.  Virtual reality is a tremendous tool for instructing students and new employees on the safe operation of equipment used in our industry.

WCA will be introducing our new pilot program WCA 4.0, focused on training and accrediting machine operators who work in cell-based manufacturing environments.  The WCA invites owners and managers of wood manufacturing companies to engage in face-to-face discussion about how WCA 4.0 can help them develop a skilled and stable workforce.

Thanks a bunch, to AWFS and Expo Auctions for organizing a special silent auction to benefit the WCA. Net proceeds of this fun event will allow WCA to further its workforce development and industry outreach programs. More than 80 sports and entertainment collectables, excursions and mother items are available now for online bidding. Even if you are not attending the show, you can still join the auction online and support the WCA!

Lastly, I am very happy to share that the WCA credentialed over 280 candidates this spring and our membership continues to grow on all fronts: Education, Manufacturing and Industry supporters. If you’re going to the show, be sure to visit us at booth #10268. Let’s discuss how we can work together to develop and grow a skilled woodworking workforce.

Scott Nelson
President
Woodwork Career Alliance of North America
snelsonwca@gmail.com

AWFS Fair Auction Opens; Supports WCA’s Workforce Development Programs

Early-bird bidding opens. Enjoy an all-new online experience with the AWFS Fair Silent Auction benefitting the Woodwork Career Alliance.

NELLYSFORD, VA – A helmet signed by four-time Super Bowl champ Tom Brady, guitars autographed by Jimmy Buffet and Ted Nugent, and a South African safari excursion are among the many and diverse items that will be auctioned during the AWFS Fair in Las Vegas.

The silent auction is presented through the special collaboration of Expo Auctions of Sugar Hill, GA, and the Association of Woodworking & Furnishing Suppliers (AWFS). Net proceeds will benefit the Woodwork Career Alliance of North America (WCA), a non-profit organization dedicated to developing and growing a skilled woodworking workforce. 

Separate silent auctions will take place on each of the first three days of AWFS Fair, Wednesday July 17 through Friday July 19. Show attendees and exhibit personnel will be able to view most of the auction items displayed on tables located in the concourse between the two entrances of the Central Hall of the Las Vegas Convention Center. These and other auction items – more than 80 in all – are available now for early online bidding. Expo Auctions’ mobile bidding platform allows bidders to participate from anywhere in the world using their smartphone. 

Expo Auctions’ treasure trove of interesting and curious auction items will also include an assortment of popular sports, entertainment and historical memorabilia; VIP trips to Tuscany, Belize and St. Thomas; and spirit and wine packages.

As Easy as 1, 2, 3
To participate in the silent auction and review all auction items:

  1. Visit the official auction website BidEarlyBidOften.com or text SILENT AUCTION to 56651.
  2.  Register your mobile phone number, email and name.
  3. Bidding closes at each day on July 17, 18 and 19 at 3 p.m. PST.

Text notifications will be sent to bid winners at the close of each day’s auction communicating payment options and pick up. Winning bidders, including those not attending the AWFS Fair, will be charged for shipping their merchandise if required. 

“We are pleased to provide a channel through the AWFS Fair to support the Woodwork Career Alliance and its efforts to strengthen and develop skill standards and a skilled workforce for our industry,” said Adria Salvatore, AWFS education and conference director. “We hope to raise funds from this auction so that WCA can help expand school programs, allow more students and professional woodworkers to earn their skill credentials, and provide more resources for teachers to connect with our industry.”

 “AWFS has been a fantastic supporter of the Woodwork Career Alliance over the years,” said Scott Nelson, WCA president. “We deeply appreciate that the WCA has been designated to receive the net proceeds of this fun fundraising program. As a not-for-profit organization, we greatly appreciate this support to us connect with more schools and woodworking companies to develop the next generation of skilled woodworkers.”

Learn more about the WCA and its skill standards and credentialing programs at AWFS booth 10268 or visit woodworkcareer.org.

Bid Early Bid Often

 

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About the Woodwork Career Alliance
The Woodwork Career Alliance of North America was founded in 2007 as a 501(c)(3) non-profit corporation and is governed by a volunteer board of directors. The WCA’s mission is to develop and administer a unified set of Skill Standards for the wood products industry. Since 2011, WCA has developed observable and measurable performance standards and assessments for more than 300 woodworking machine operations. In addition, WCA has issued more than 2,500 credentials, a portable, personal permanent record documenting each holder’s record of woodworking skill achievements. More than 100 high schools and post-secondary schools throughout North America are WCA EDUcation™ members. To learn more about the WCA and how to get involved with its programs, including sponsorship opportunities, visit WoodworkCareer.org. 

Mark Smith ‘Casts a Vision’ to Support His Woodshop Program

 

 This veteran woodworking instructor discusses the multiple benefits
of marketing his program.

Mark Smith isn’t bashful about tooting a horn loud and often to call attention to his high school woodworking program.

“I’ve learned that you have to cast a vision of your program outside your classroom so that the superintendent, school board, community and local industry sees what you are doing and after a while they get it,” says Smith, woodworking instructor of Reed-Custer High School in Braidwood, IL. “Not blowing their horns is probably the biggest mistake woodworking teachers make. When the money crunch happens, no one wants to keep their program off the block because no one knows what they are doing.”

To cast a vision of his program, Smith regularly sends out press releases and posts them to several popular social media channels.

“I’ll put out a press release at least once a month,” Smith says. “It might be about a material donation to our program or about one of our students getting an internship. I then post the release on Instagram, Facebook and LinkedIn. After a while, if you don’t know what’s going on with our program, then you’re probably not using any of those platforms.”

Over the years, Smith has built up a press release database that now numbers nearly 500 strong. Contacts include local media, national woodworking publications, industry and private supporters, school district administrators, school board members and anyone who expresses interest in keeping informed about what’s going on in his classroom. In addition, Smith has amassed some 6,000 LinkedIn connections, 600 Facebook friends and 575 Instagram followers.

Recent PR Examples
With approximately 100 students enrolled in one of his seven woodworking classes structured around the Woodwork Career Alliance’s Skill Standards, Smith never runs out of things to promote.

In one of his recent press releases, Smith publicized a gaming chair designed and fabricated by a student in his program. The LinkedIn post succinctly summarizes the student’s accomplishment.

“This RCHS Industrial Technology student designed in AutoCAD, toolpathed in Mastercam, and machined on our Thermwood Model 43 CNC Router this no hardware, knock down gaming chair for his independent student class.”

The post ends with this call to action, “Looking for future skilled employees? Contact us and begin building a mutually beneficial relationship.”

Another press release pays homage to Reed-Custer’s EDUcation™ membership in the Woodwork Career Alliance. (Smith, is a member of the WCA Education Committee and participated in developing the WCA’s Skill Standards.) Again, the cut-to-the-chase LinkedIn post reads, “Franklin International and Woodwork Career Alliance Support Reed-Custer High School’s Industrial Technology Program with Glue Donation.” The post includes a photo of a Reed-Custer student holding up a container of Franklin glue and concludes with this plug: “Industry supporters make it possible to offer great educational opportunities to our students. You can visit http://rchsit.weebly.com/program-supporters.html to see all of our industry supporters. If you would like to support the industrial technology program at RCHS, contact us at: mark.smith@rc255.net.”

Taking the Stage at AWFS Fair
Smith was gearing up to deliver multiple seminar presentations in the Teacher Track at the AWFS Fair in Las Vegas when he was interviewed for this article. “Marketing Your Program – How to Get Started!” is the title of one of his sessions set for 9:30 a.m. Friday, July 19.

The presentation will cover why and how to market an educational woodworking program, including how to write press releases, leverage free social media channels and making industry connections.

“One of the premises of my presentation is that no one is ever thanked too much,” Smith says. “Because people donate stuff to support our program, I make sure that we thank them in numerous ways. Of course, I send them an email thank you, but I also mail out a certificate of appreciation. If any of our recent donors are exhibiting at the AWFS Fair, I plan to stop by their booth and hand them the certificate in person and arrange for a picture to be taken. That becomes the basis for a press release.

“The second premise is the importance of networking. Way back in 2000 I was attending a regional woodworking show in Milwaukee and met Jerry Finch, then a woodworking instructor at Oshkosh College. “Jerry became a mentor of mine. He taught me the importance of promoting your program and the skills of your students. He altered the course of my professional career. Now I tell my students all the time that you can be the best in the world in something, but if nobody knows it, how are you benefitting? How are you creating opportunities to expand your horizons?”

To illustrate his point about the importance of casting a vision for his program and networking, Smith says, “It really all comes down to making connections and getting your name out there. Ultimately people are sitting in a meeting somewhere and the topic comes up of starting a woodworking internship program, donating excess material or partnering with a local school on a training program. There’s a good chance that someone will raise his or her hand and say, ‘I know this guy named Mark Smith who teaches woodworking at Reed-Custer High School. He’s always sending me stuff about his students’ projects. Let’s work with him. Let’s help his kids.’ A lot of time that’s how it works. It’s just a matter of being in the right place at the right time. If you are always casting your vision, networking and putting your students out front, eventually opportunities will present themselves.”

Measuring Success
“I measure success of my marketing program in multiple ways,” Smith says. “One way is how many of my students go into industry. Every year we have kids who begin careers with woodworking companies and others who participate in internship programs. I love the woodworking industry and I’m proud that so many of the kids I teach do so, too.

Smith says a second measurement for gauging success of his promotional efforts “is the number of industry professionals who are willing to come in and talk to the students about their careers or talk about their products. Every year we get several. It’s a big deal because these people are busy.”

“I think when a company is willing to give technical support, a material donation or whatever, that it is another indicator of success,” Smith continues. “I think the list is more than 100 items long of what we have received from industry. That’s kind of a badge of honor for us because if someone is willing to give us something of value, then we must be doing something right.”

“Yet another important indicator is how the school administration and school board view our program. If they view what we are doing positively, then that’s a huge plus because they don’t have the time to come down and see for themselves.”

Free Advice
Smith is happy to share his experiences to help other teachers more quickly establish a successful marketing program. But he doesn’t have a lot of time to deal with those that whine they don’t have the time to do so.

“When I talk to a teacher who says, ‘I don’t have time for that,’ I think maybe they need to get more efficient or better organized because I think you have to have an extra two hours over the course of a month. I think they see all of the things that I’m doing and think, ‘Holy cow, that will take me five years just to set all of that up.’ And it’s true. You have to slowly develop and build it as you have time.

“I have to remind them that what I’m doing wasn’t built in a day. I’ve built my marketing program over 20 years, really since the time I met Jerry Finch. He talked to me about how to do these things and I started to do them. I started with press releases with a small list and over time, I built that list adding one contact at a time. After a while it takes on a life of its own because the kids help me do it. Sometimes the kids put together the press release or sometimes I use one of their pictures. It really becomes a team effort.”

President’s Message: Evaluator Training at AWFS Fair; WIC Auction Is Music to Our Ears

The AWFS Fair in Las Vegas is now less than three months away.  WCA, with the help of our friends at the Association of Woodworking & Furnishing Suppliers, will once again offer Accredited Skill Evaluator training for woodworking educators and industry trainers during the show.

The three-hour trainings will take place at the WCA’s booth #10268 at the following times:

Wednesday, July 17
9:00 a.m. – 12:00 p.m.
1:00 p.m. – 4:00 p.m.

Thursday, July 18
9:00 a.m. – 12:00 p.m.
1:00 p.m. – 4:00 p.m.

Friday, July 19
9:00 a.m. – 12:00 p.m.
1:00 p.m. – 4:00 p.m.

Saturday, July 20
9:00 a.m. – 12:00 p.m.

Only four seats are available for each session and several of them have already are already spoken for. To make sure you don’t miss out, I recommend that you register ASAP by contacting me at snelsonwca@gmail.com.

As an added inducement, WCA and AWFS are offering a SHOW SPECIAL PRICE of $150 per evaluator, which is a savings of $100. The registration fee also includes a one-year subscription for your school or company to be an EDUcation™ or MANufacturing™ member.

The training sessions will include an overview of the WCA Skill Standards and demonstrations of how to evaluate a student’s or employee’s proficiency to perform a woodworking task or setup and safely operate a machine. Those who successfully complete the training session will be certified as an Accredited Skills Evaluator and be able to reward students or employees with credential points.

WCA is also involved with three free 90-minute workshops during the show.

Patrick Molzahn, director of Madison College’s Cabinetmaking & Millwork program, will present WCA – What’s in It for Me at 1:30 p.m. Wednesday, July 17.

Patrick will also present Finding, Training & Retaining Workers at 11:30 a.m. Thursday, July 18.

Finally, Patrick and I will co-present Building a Training Program for Your Workers at 3:30 p.m. Friday, July 19.

A Hearty Thank You
I am very pleased to announce that the Live Auction held during the annual Woodworking Industry Conference raised $3,300 for WCA’s Education Fund. I would personally like to thank Jim Laster of Newman Machine for making and donating a beautiful ukulele and Michael Burdis of James L. Taylor Mfg. for being determined to buy Jim’s masterpiece for $3,000!

Thanks again to the Wood Machinery Manufacturers of America and Woodworking Machinery Industry Association, organizers of the WIC, for supporting the WCA!

Scott Nelson
President
Woodwork Career Alliance of North America
snelsonwca@gmail.com

Woodwork Career Alliance to Present Three Free Seminars at AWFS Fair

Patrick Molzahn receives the first ever Diamond credential from Scott Nelson, president of the WCA at IWF 2018.

Patrick Molzahn, left, director of the Cabinetmaking & Millwork program at Madison College, and Scott Nelson, president of the WCA, will co-present a seminar on workforce development at the AWFS Fair in Las Vegas. 

Representatives of the WCA will share ideas for developing a skilled woodworking workforce.

 

Nellysford, VA — Owners and managers of woodworking businesses challenged by a low number of job applicants and/or high employee turnover rate are encouraged to attend free College of Woodworking Knowledge seminar sessions featuring the Woodwork Career Alliance of North America at the AWFS Fair, July 17-20 in Las Vegas.

The WCA is scheduled to participate in a pair of free seminars of the fair’s Culture & Workforce Track and one free seminar in the Teacher track.  The sessions include:

WCA – WIIFM: What’s In It For Me?
1:30 p.m. to 3:30 p.m. Wednesday, July 17
Presenter: Patrick Molzahn, director of Cabinetmaking & Millwork, Madison College and secretary of the WCA
Whether you are in education or in industry, this session will provide ideas that you can use to implement the Woodwork Career Alliance credentialing system to create and manage a training program in your school or business. The presenter, who has used the WCA Skill Standards to shape his curriculum, will demonstrate how to improve your training program and discuss how members can take advantage of the WCA’s online library of videos, educational materials and other training resources to help you accomplish your goals faster and better.

Finding, Training and Retaining Workers
11:30 a.m. to 1:00 p.m. Thursday, July 18
Presenter: Patrick Molzahn, director of Cabinetmaking & Millwork, Madison College and secretary of the WCA
Where are all the workers? If only I could find someone with skills. These millennials just don’t have the work ethic we expect. Does this sound familiar? In a tight labor market, you need to get creative. This seminar will provide strategies to overcome many of the challenges you face recruiting and retaining quality employees.

Building a Training Program for Your Workers
3:30 p.m. to 5:00 p.m. Friday, July 19
Presenters: Scott Nelson, president of the WCA & Patrick Molzahn, director of Cabinetmaking & Millwork, Madison College and secretary of the WCA
Are you looking to create you own in-house training program? This ‘nuts & bolts’ session will show you how to get started and how you can access ready-made resources to make the job easier. The presenters will discuss how to assess new candidates on layout and measurement and how to customize your training template. Come to this session to learn:

  • How to access quality training resources;
  • How to develop and structure a training plan – including creating a template; and
  • The benefits of doing in-house training.

In addition to those three free seminars, instructors of two WCA EDUcation™ institutions will present sessions in the Teacher track. John Stearns of the MiLL is scheduled to talk on Classroom Tool Safety, Teacher Curriculum and Resources, and How to Get Money for Your Program & Spend It Wisely. Mark Smith of Reed Cutler High School will discuss AutoCAD for the Woodworking Program and Marketing Your Program: How to Get Started.

To learn more and register for AWFS Fair seminars, visit awfsfair.org.

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About the Woodwork Career Alliance
The Woodwork Career Alliance of North America was founded in 2007 as a 501(c)(3) non-profit corporation and is governed by a volunteer board of directors. The WCA’s mission is to develop and administer a unified set of Skill Standards for the wood products industry. Since 2011, WCA has developed observable and measurable performance standards and assessments for more than 240 woodworking machine operations. In addition, WCA has issued more than 2,500 credentials, a portable, personal permanent record documenting each holder’s record of woodworking skill achievements. More than 100 high schools and post-secondary schools throughout North America are WCA EDUcation™ members. To learn more about the WCA and how to get involved with its programs, including sponsorship opportunities, visit WoodworkCareer.org.

Closing the Skills Gap: A Call to Action

Kent Gilchrist is not an evangelist; he’s a woodworker. Still he is passionate about woodworking education and training and fervent in his belief that all sectors of the industry must come together to meet the long-standing challenge of developing and growing a skilled work force.

Gilchrist, owner of Fremont Interiors of Indianapolis, has been active in woodworking education and workforce development with the Architectural Woodwork Institute (AWI) for more than two decades, including serving as president of the AWI Education Foundation. For the past 10 years he has also served as chairman of AWI’s SkillsUSA Committee and is technical chair of the national SkillsUSA Cabinetmaking competition. In addition to his role as a member of the Woodwork Career Alliance’s (WCA) Board of Directors, Gilchrist recently was appointed director of business and workforce development by the WCA. In this latter capacity, Gilchrist is charged with rallying industry participation in the Skilled Labor and Workforce Development Coalition, a new initiative backed by the WCA.

At the AWFS Fair in Las Vegas, Gilchrist will take to the main stage of the show floor to deliver a special presentation to woodworking executives, “Workforce Crisis – Job One,” 9:30 a.m. to 11 a.m. Wednesday, July 19. The free session will explore the root causes of the skilled labor shortage; where to find woodworking candidates; and how to educate, train and retain current employees.

Gilchrist also will discuss the Skilled Labor and Workforce Development Coalition and how industry associations, manufacturers and suppliers can get involved to become part of the solution. These topics will carry over in one-on-one conversations with woodworkers, suppliers and educators throughout the four-day show.

Connecting the Dots
“We all know that we have a skills gap problem. That conversation has been worn out,” Gilchrist said. “What I plan to talk about at the show is our need to discover why we have a problem and realize that it’s different from state by state and region by region. To combat the problem we need to research where the career and technical education schools are, where the employees are and what jobs are available to build a better database of information and build better lines of communication. We haven’t done a very good job of communicating when it comes to discussing the skilled labor shortage with one another. You can talk to two shop owners who have problems finding help but they might be two very different problems. One might need a skilled bench person and the other might be looking for a CNC operator. That makes a significant difference in where you can find that kind of worker.

“We need more members of our industry to be aware, utilize and support their local high school and postsecondary schools, as well as job training and apprenticeship programs,” Gilchrist continued. “We also need to continue to get the word out about the WCA’s Woodworking Skill Standards and how woodworking companies can integrate them into their training programs.”

Gilchrist added that it’s also important for industry to work together to promote woodworking as a viable career opportunity not only to students but their parents. “Our industry has long suffered from a negative image as being backward and dead end. We need to get the word out about the new technologies that we are using on our shop floors and how today’s woodworkers can advance their careers and grow their incomes by increasing their skills.”

Now is the time to work toward enacting positive change, Gilchrist said.

“We need to put the days of moaning about not being able find good help behind us and start addressing the problem head on,” Gilchrist said. “Unless people in this industry step up and get involved it’s not going to change.”

Woodwork Career Alliance to Highlight Workforce Development in Vegas

Nellysford, VA – The Woodwork Career Alliance of North America (WCA), celebrating its 10th anniversary as the champion of woodworking skill standards, will present a well-rounded collection of workforce development tools and strategies at the AWFS Fair July 19-22 in Las Vegas.

Since it was chartered in 2007, the WCA has developed Skill Standards for more than 240 woodworking machines and operations and issued nearly 1,400 individual skill credential passports. The standards and passports are recognized by educational institutions and woodworking companies operating throughout the United States and Canada. The overarching goal of the WCA is to develop and grow the industry’s workforce by creating pathways for woodworkers to advance their careers and income as they learn new skills.

The WCA’s integral participation at the AWFS Fair will include previewing new training tools, offering seven Accredited Skill Evaluator Training sessions and leading three of the AWFS Fair’s College of Woodworking Knowledge seminars.

The WCA’s booth #9846 will anchor the AWFS Fair’s new “Higher Education Learning Pavilion” (HELP). Woodworking instructors can stop by the WCA’s booth to learn about the benefits of becoming an EDUcation® member. Woodworkers and suppliers can learn about the value of WCA INDustry membership. The WCA also will preview first generation training materials developed by Madison College instructor Patrick Molzahn, a WCA Chief Evaluator. In addition to more than 50 videos, Molzahn has assembled training outlines, teaching notes, exercises and activities to help build a woodworking candidate’s skill and knowledge. All of these training tools are correlated to his recently revised textbook, Modern Cabinetmaking, and represent a major new benefit for INDustry and EDUcation members.

Molzahn will be joined by fellow WCA chief evaluators Kent Gilchrist and Greg Larson, to present accredited skill evaluator training sessions slated for each day of the show. These train-the-trainer workshops teach woodworking program instructors how to evaluate passport holders’ skill standard achievements. Woodworking instructors interested in reserving a seat for one of the evaluator training sessions should contact WCA President Scott Nelson at snelson@gmail.com

The WCA will be well represented in the AWFS Fair College of Woodworking Knowledge education program. Each of the three programs presented by WCA members will focus on workforce development. These timely WCA-led sessions include:

  • Workforce Crisis – Job One, 9:30 a.m. to 11:00 a.m. Wednesday, July 19 – Kent Gilchrist will explain how to find qualified woodworking candidates and how to educate, train and retain valued woodworking employees.
  • Create Your Own In-House Training Program with WCA Skill Standards & Passport Program, 1:30 p.m. to 3:00 p.m. Wednesday, July 19 – Scott Nelson, President of the WCA, will present how woodworking companies can use the WCA Skill Standards to develop a training program to evaluate and reward the skill levels of new and existing employees.
  •  Tools for Teaching and Evaluating the WCA Standards, 11:30 a.m. to 1:30 p.m. Friday, July 21 – Patrick Molzahn and Bert Christiansen will show how schools or woodworking shops can implement the WCA’s credentialing Passport system and access the WCA’s training tools to develop an effective training program.

Learn more about the Woodwork Career Alliance and its Skill Standards and Passport programs at www.WoodworkCareer.org.

About the Woodwork Career Alliance
The Woodwork Career Alliance of North America was founded in 2007 as a 501C(3) non-profit corporation and is governed by a volunteer board of directors. The WCA’s mission is to develop and administer a unified set of Skill Standards for the wood products industry. Since 2011, WCA has developed observable and measurable performance standards and assessments for more than 240 woodworking machine operations. In addition, WCA has issued more than 1,400 Passports, a portable, personal permanent record documenting each holder’s record of achievements as a woodworking professional. More than 165 high schools and post-secondary schools throughout North America are WCA EDUcation members. To learn more about the WCA and how to get involved with its programs, visit www.WoodworkCareer.org.

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